sexhaver:

rasputin:

Portuguese designer Susana Soares has developed a device for detecting cancer and other serious diseases using trained bees. The bees are placed in a glass chamber into which the patient exhales; the bees fly into a smaller secondary chamber if they detect cancer. 

Scientists have found that honey bees - Apis mellifera - have an extraordinary sense of smell that is more acute than that of a sniffer dog and can detect airborne molecules in the parts-per-trillion range. 

Bees can be trained to detect specific chemical odours, including the biomarkers associated with diseases such as tuberculosis, lung, skin and pancreatic cancer.

breathe into the BEE ORB to reveal your fate

prostheticknowledge:

Real-Time Face Tracking and Projection Mapping

Impressive proof-of-concept demonstration from OMOTE which accurately projects visuals onto a moving human face - video embedded below:

[Link]

tumbr561pete:

txchnologist:

Robot Self-Assembles And Walks

by Michael Keller

Roboticists have developed a flat machine that can fold itself into an operational form and take a walk. 

Built mostly from paper and polystyrene plastic that shrinks into a memorized shape when heated, the robot can assemble in around four minutes. It can crawl at roughly 2 inches per second and make turns. The work by Harvard and MIT engineers represents the first time that a robot has self-assembled and performed a function without humans needing to intervene.  

“Here we created a full electromechanical system that was embedded into one flat sheet,” said Harvard Microrobotics Lab researcher and doctoral student Sam Felton. “Imagine a ream of dozens of robotic satellites sandwiched together so that they could be sent up to space and then assemble themselves remotely once they get there–they could take images, collect data and more.”

Read More

It’s all starting to come true!!!

bravecadet:

The Oculus Rift Made Me Believe I Could Fly

bravecadet:

The Oculus Rift Made Me Believe I Could Fly

ri-science:

A demonstration of the VeinViewer - a device which allows you to see through the skin. The VeinViewer uses near-infrared light to detect vessels and blood up to 10mm beneath the surface, and projects a picture onto the skin to reveal vessel structure and blood flow in real time.

Clip taken from the 2013 Royal Institution CHRISTMAS LECTURES: Life Fantastic Lecture 1 - Where do I come from?

prostheticknowledge:

Ceramic 3D Printer

Artist Jonathan Keep has put together a 3D printer to produce digital objects out of clay, and has put together a document to build one:

Based on the delta type of 3D printer my aim has been to use parts that can either be made with basic DIY tools and skills, or ordered off the internet. The design is specifically for printing in clay but could be adapted to work with other materials. Many other self build 3D printers use parts printed in plastic but with this project I did not want to be reliant on already having access to a 3D printer.

More Here

Looking at Jonathan’s website (in particular the ‘Digital Pots' section), you will see various series based on various ideas. There is the Random Growth of generative forms, Sound Surface based on musical audio data, and other computational methods.

More examples of work can be found here

zerostatereflex:

7 Finger Robot

"The device, worn around one’s wrist, works essentially like two extra fingers adjacent to the pinky and thumb. The robot, which the researchers have dubbed "supernumerary robotic fingers," or "SR fingers," consists of actuators linked together to exert forces as strong as those of human fingers during a grasping motion."

Robot tech, YES.

theswindlr:

3D printed pasta shells from Linda Saleh

via Notcot